How to get kids’ passports

Mums and dads don’t have the luxury of just having to sort out their own passports before heading abroad. Instead, they’ve got to ensure that their children also have a passport ahead of a family holiday. It’s a little more work, yes – but it’s something that most parents should be able to arrange without too much difficulty in this day and age. With this in mind, here’s how to get kids’ passports.

What’s the process?

The process is pretty much the same as the one required for those applicants aged 16+. You simply have to fill out the official forms and submit two pictures to the passport office. Thankfully, you’ll be able to do the bulk of the heavy lifting without having to get your kids involved.

kids’ passports photo

Who needs one?

Everyone needs a passport if they’re to be permitted to go abroad. A child’s passport will be issued to anyone under the age of 16. Even newborn babies require a passport if they’re to leave the country with their parents.

How long is the passport valid?

Unlike an adult passport that lasts for 10 years, a child’s passport is only valid for five years. This is largely due to how much kids’ facial features can change throughout their childhood and adolescence. Therefore, you may need to go through the process several times before your child reaches 16.

Are there any obstacles?

The only real part of the application that requires effort and energy from your child is the passport photo. Luckily, this can now be done from the comfort of your own home. While mums and dads previously had to queue up with their child outside of a photo booth, the pictures can now be taken with a mobile phone and authorized online before being submitted to the passport office. This has, undoubtedly, removed the biggest obstacle for most parents.

Use Paspic!

The process of applying for a kid’s passport needn’t be a hassle – especially if you use Paspic. Through this service, you’ll have peace of mind that the picture you’re submitting meets all the government guidelines and won’t be rejected.

Photo: stoic by efleming licensed under Creative commons 2